With the passing of yet another legend of popular culture, and another childhood hero of mine in Chester Bennington I have just one question: when are we going to wake up and start realizing there’s a problem and we need to do something to solve it?

I’m not suggesting rock stars get special treatment, but the level of fame, high stakes pressure and status is obviously taking its toll on the individuals we the public see as untouchable, perfect and with it all. These are the leaders that shape our youth and the stigma associated with mental health. If more celebrities, high profile artists and bands felt comfortable sharing their battles with depression, anxiety and other mental health issues then maybe the rest of us would feel better talking about it in an open forum much as we do about the flu, a rolled ankle or stubborn cough. It’s all sickness. Not optimized health. Mental vs. physical is irrelevant. It just needs to be discussed.

Clearly we are skipping steps. The industry needs to set up and advocate for a program of proactive health to which all areas of strength and confidence in both mental and physical wellbeing are treated. Here’s the thing:

I have the platform.

I wrote the book on it. Get it on Amazon – The Musician’s Guide To Surviving The Rock Star Lifestyle

I host the podcast to which we talk about it. Subscribe on iTunes – How To Survive The Rock Star Lifestyle Podcast

I train people to be fit, mentally, physically and emotionally. Check us out here – INLIV.com

All I need is the support.

Together we can help raise mental health awareness and break the stigma associated with depression, anxiety and addiction. Let’s talk, because I am sick of reading headlines like this every month or so about the rock idols that I grew up worshipping….

https://consequenceofsound.net/2017/07/r-i-p-chester-bennington-linkin-park-singer-has-died-at-age-of-41/

It’s getting really frustrating because it’s something we can fix by just opening up avenues of conversation.

Contact me here if you wish to speak on my podcast. You don’t have to be a rock star, musician or even musically inclined. However, if this story has made an impression, if you have been affected by mental health in any capacity, I want to offer you a platform to speak to it and inform others.

I am going to host a special edition podcast once we have some input in order to bring to light the darkness that is mental health awareness. It’s a safe, respectful, environment for those of you that wish to say anything about your experience with mental health. It can be a story, a specific experience you have had, how mental health has affected you or a friend/family member or how the loss of these amazing talents to something so silly has impacted your life…. anything at all. Even just a quick few sentences. I want your stories to help others realize there’s outlets for assistance. There are places to seek help and a community that supports you in your darkest of places. Together we can break the stigma. I’ve been down that road a couple times myself, but fortunately never to the point that some get to because I’ve had resources to help me through. Let’s showcase these resources for others that may not be aware. Let’s make it cool to talk about mental health.

I’m here to share your story. Please help me break the stigma!

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Dear Mr. Cornell,

We’ve never met, but I wanted to let you know that you had a tremendous impact on my life, and this is a letter of thanks for all that you have done for the world.

It’s a shame that you are no longer with us, and it’s a wonder how many more lives like yours will end far before their time before we take notice and do something to help. Like, really help. I get it. I really do. I can only imagine how incredible the pressure must be in the place that you were. To have overcome drug abuse and addiction multiple times, that in and of itself is commendable. But as I’ve learned, that’s only the first step.

It’s unfortunate you weren’t given an outlet to express yourself after all the rehab. Or maybe you were, but you weren’t comfortable for some reason in expressing anything to anyone but your music. And we all had no idea. The turmoil inside your soul must have been a nightmare. It’s unfortunately that while everyone saw what Chris was on the outside; cheery, un-phased, recovered – they never thought to dig deeper and to ask you how you were really doing. Maybe you would have just told them what they wanted to hear anyways… maybe not. I like to think that if someone genuinely made a connection, I might have had a chance to thank you in person. Yeah, you were a legend. But everyone deserves an ear… maybe that’s all you needed. Someone to confide in. A professional shoulder to lean on. Someone to listen to you for more than Spoonman or Like A Highway.

To close, I hope to have a fraction of the impact on the industry and other musicians as you have had on my life. In a positive light, your passing has inspired me even more so to make a stand and pursue my dream of bringing an end to these tragedies in the music industry. Far too many die young and this is a great tragedy to world. Music touches the soul. Your songs and stories and musical ingenuity have inspired so many and will last a lifetime. So while we say goodbye, this is an unfortunate lesson that we can all use to reconsider how we approach proactive care. Depression, anxiety, stress, abuse, addiction… they’re all very real reminders that we are all just human…

Thank you for all of your work and passion to the craft. You will be missed deeply. Rest in peace.