Why is everyone so fixated on failure?

The important thing to realize is that you will likely fail when you try something new. That is okay. What is not okay is when you fail to even try.

I hit a CrossFit box here in London this morning. A few things were ugly about that whole situation.

  1. I’m not very good at CrossFit
  2. It was balls early, 6:15am start time. For anyone in their usual environment that’s nasty, but for a touring musician, living out of a suitcase it’s heinous.
  3. While I enjoy exercise a lot, my eagerness can sometimes alienate others around me

As you can see, lots of room to fail.

And I did. By technical standards. Hell, my bench game is weak. No way around it.

Learn to Forget Things Quick

Todays Workout of The Day (W.O.D) saw us hit a ton of shoulders and chest, areas of opportunity to improve in my personal fitness game, so going in I knew I was going to be up against a lot. The last time I tried to PR my bench, 135 was about it for a few rounds of 5. So today, in trying to get my 5RM, I failed at 135. I’m okay with that. It’s a hole in my armour and I will spend some time working on my chest strength. Had I not tried I’d have never known.

Looking at Failure as Information

If we change our language from “pass/fail” to “gather info” regarding these kinds of situations, we allow ourselves the forgiveness to accept our attempt and problem “solve” rather than just problem “find”.

Par for the course lately. I’ve always gotten a thrill of being the underdog. Against all odds, somehow finding a way to drive the ship through all that pressure, adversity and overwhelming stress to pull it off. I’m playing my 4th show with Midnight Shine tomorrow in Hamilton. Coming off a less than perfect set in Webequie, I need to find the wherewithal to learn from the experiences I had in order to effectively course correct. In theory, each performance… each workout I hit bench… I’ll get a little bit better. That’s the key. 1%.

“Get Back Up. Get. Back. Up.”

Get knocked down 7, 8, 9 times? That’s fine. You just have to find a way to get back up 10. The innate ability to bounce back.

That’s just a characteristic I’ve always had. Grateful my childhood taught me that. My parents taught me the value of hard work and how important it is to outwork everyone else. Authentically.

If you are struggling. Ask for help. If you assume people know you’re struggling and you wait for them to bring it up, you’re doing a disservice to everyone. Check the ego at the door, ask for help.

Literally, I had the bar come down on my chest after 3 reps in my 4th set and Coach Jamie had to pull it off me. We then talked about locking the shoulder blades back and bracing the core and poof… whaddaya know –  I pulled of 5 on my last set.

I also need to know where I stand for performances. I want feedback so I can improve in areas that are opportunity to get better. Performance reviews are popular in organizations and the music business should be no different. So I’m looking for that.

Don’t Take Things Personally

With no squats on the WOD today, I had to rise up and work on the stuff I’m not so good at. It was great. It was authentic. Because I haven’t done rope climbs, I asked for a variation in order to work my way up to it one day. I was also asked to scale my push-up variations nearing the end as my body was just plain gassed and my technical form was starting to suffer. That’s great coaching. Nothing to take personally. My body was just toast at that point.

Be You

That ties it to my final point. One thing is for sure: I’m okay if I don’t fit in because I was who I am. I’m not okay with being on a path embossed with inauthentic motives. I wanna be me and when I’m not happy, it’s not worth it. Not the workout. Not the tourbus.

Just be you, bounce back and remember it’s a long game we’re playing. Have fun with it.

Ciao from the road!

xo

M

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